Muammar al-Gaddafi

Saif al-Islam´s Silver-Plated Rifle | Jih@d

Posted on Updated on

2011/11/19 by Florian Flade

 
PreviousToggle PlaybackNext

His name is one with a very powerful and well-respected meaning – “Sword of Islam”. Yet the most prominent son of former Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi, Saif al-Islam al-Gaddafi, has never truely lived up to the meaning of his name. Maybe for that reason the Libyan opposition fighters labeled him “Saif al-Kufr” instead – Sword of Disbelief.

Today Saif al-Islam al-Gaddafi was captured by captured by the forces of the Transitional Council in Obari in the South of Libya and taken to Tripolis in a plane.

For months the Gaddafi son had been living in hiding, releasing audio tapes in which he called the opposition enemies of Libya. “Go to hell you rats and NATO”, he said in a audio tape released in October. Read the rest of this entry »

Gadhafi’s son captured: reports

Posted on Updated on

Ronald D. Orol

Saif al-Islam Gadhafi sits in an airplane in Zintan, LIbya, on Saturday after being captured in the southern desert and flown to the northern city.

WASHINGTON (MarketWatch) – Moammar Gadhafi’s son has been captured in the desert by fighters who plan to hold him until there is a Libyan administration to which they can hand him over, according to media reports Saturday.

Gadhafi’s son, Saif al-Islam Gadhafi, 39, had been accused of crimes against humanity.

Saif al-Islam was captured near the southern desert city of Obari and flown to the fighters’ base in Zintan, in northern Libya, the BBC reported.

It was unclear Saturday whether al-Islam will face trial in Libya or whether he will be transferred to the International Criminal Court in the Hague, Netherlands, for a trial there for his alleged involvement in the killings of civilian protesters. Read the rest of this entry »

Black Flag – A mysterious Islamist banner has been popping up across the Middle East, from Benghazi to Lebanon.

Posted on Updated on

Recent days have seen a spate of stories about a mysterious flag appearing in Benghazi, Libya: a black banner that reads “No god but God” in distinctive white lettering with what could be a reproduction of the Prophet Mohammad‘s seal underneath.”Were it not for the deficiencies of reporting on Libya in the mainstream Western media,” writes John Rosenthal in the National Review, “the appearance of al-Qaeda flags in the capital of the anti-Qaddafi rebellion should come as no surprise.” Writing for Vice, Sherif Elhelwa reports that he even saw the flag flying atop the famous Benghazi courthouse that became a hotbed of resistance in Muammar al-Qaddafi‘s waning days, and that his efforts to find out why it was there were met with suspicion and threats. Read the rest of this entry »

Zintan Brigade refuses to leave Tripoli

Posted on Updated on

The leader de facto of Libya, Muammar al-Gadda...
Image via Wikipedia
2011-09-07 11:19

Tripoli – Libya‘s Zintan Brigade, formed by its cult leader who died in a fierce battle with Muammar Gaddafi’s forces, refuses to cede control of vital installations in Tripoli until the Libyan capital is safe.

“We are all sons of Mohammed Ali Madani” who was killed in combat on May 01, said one proud brigade member on Tuesday, echoing the feelings of his comrades, as they basked in the hot sun at the Regatta seafront complex on the outskirts of Tripoli where Gaddafi’s sons had luxurious beach bungalows. Read the rest of this entry »

Libyan, Tuareg convoy heads for Niger capital

Posted on Updated on

Niamey, Niger's capital and economic hub
Image via Wikipedia
NIAMEY, Niger (AP) — Armed loyalists of Moammar Gadhafi crossed in several convoys from Libya into neighboring Niger and the toppled Libyanleader’s own security chief was at the head of one of the columns Tuesday as it rolled into Niamey, the capital, officials said.Customs official Harouna Ide told The Associated Press that Mansour Dao, Gadhafi’s security chief, was at the head of the first convoy. He said other Libyan convoys were south of Agadez in central Niger, a desert country bordering Libya and where Gadhafi has the support of many Tuareg tribal fighters. Read the rest of this entry »

Libyan Limbo

Posted on Updated on

Six reasons why it’s been so tough to get Qaddafi to quit.

BY DANIEL BYMAN, MATTHEW WAXMAN | JUNE 2, 2011

clip_image001

As the war in Libya drags on, the United States faces a familiar predicament: Why, despite possessing overwhelming military superiority over any foe, does it have such a hard time using the threat of force to push much weaker dictators around?

This isn’t a new problem. During the 1990s, the United States and its allies found it much harder than expected to convince Iraqi President Saddam Hussein to stop repressing opposition groups and open suspected weapons facilities to inspectors, to protect civilians in Bosnia, to force Somali warlords to stop pillaging humanitarian relief efforts, and to compel Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic to end his violent ethnic cleansing campaign in Kosovo.

A decade ago, we wrote a book pondering this very puzzle. The short answer was that political constraints often bind the United States and its coalition partners much more tightly than their adversaries, and in ways that offset advantages in raw military power. Those painfully learned lessons apply more than ever in Libya today and help explain why Libyan leader Muammar al-Qaddafi isn’t flinching against the world’s most sophisticated military forces — despite his near-complete international isolation.

Read the rest of this entry »

Witness to War

Posted on Updated on

Photographer Anton Hammerl’s final photos of the Libyan rebel front.

MAY 20, 2011

clip_image002Libya 3rd April 2011 -- Benghazi based Anti Gadaffi freedom fighters 10km outside the recaptured town of Brega and on route to the ever moving frontline bomb rebel 'Shabaab' freedom fighters despite being bombed by Nato aircraft. Gadaffi's forces losing ground close to Aljabya for the sixth time in two weeks. This after the coalition forces handed over the defensive action to Nato who has ceased bombing targets that were seen as harmful to civilians in Libya. On 8 April, loyalist forces attempted to recapture the city. Taking advantage of a disorganised rebel retreat following the Third Battle of Brega, loyalist troops entered the city and had taken control of most of it by 9 April. However, rebel forces soon regrouped and had pushed pro-Gaddafi forces out of the city by 11 April, with heavy support from NATO airstrikes. The front line then stagnated outside of the city, 40 km down the road to Brega. Loyalist shells continued to intermittently strike the western gate and outskirts of t

Xavier Mas de Xaxàs spent a day under fire with Anton Hammerl.

Benghazi-based rebels fighting outside the town of Brega on April 3.

Anton Hammerl/Africa Media Online

Libya 1st April 2011 -- Benghazi based Anti Gadaffi freedom fighters 10km outside the recaptured town of Brega and on route to the ever moving frontline bomb rebel 'Shabaab' freedom fighters despite being bombed by Nato aircraft..Gadaffi's forces regaining  ground close to Aljabya for the sixth time in two weeks. This after the coalition forces handed over the defensive action to Nato who has ceased bombing targets that were seen as harmful to civilians in Libya. On 8 April, loyalist forces attempted to recapture the city. Taking advantage of a disorganised rebel retreat following the Third Battle of Brega, loyalist troops entered the city and had taken control of most of it by 9 April. However, rebel forces soon regrouped and had pushed pro-Gaddafi forces out of the city by 11 April, with heavy support from NATO airstrikes. The front line then stagnated outside of the city, 40 km down the road to Brega. Loyalist shells continued to intermittently strike the western gate and outskirts

Rebel fighters heading toward the front line near Brega on April 3.

Read the rest of this entry »